The Great Piece of Turf

797px-Albrecht_Dürer_-_The_Large_Piece_of_Turf,_1503_-_Google_Art_Project

from Donald Kuspit:

Looking at the colors in Albrecht Dürer’s The Great Piece of Turf (1503), a watercolor and gouache heightened with white, one cannot help but be astonished at the freshness of the colors and the boldness of the image. Made 510 years ago—ten years longer than Dürer said the colors of the Heller Altarpiece would last—the work seems to have outlasted time. Described by Christof Metzger as – [along with the Young Hare (1502)] – “among the greatest masterpieces of draftsmanship in existence,” it might also be described as among the greatest masterpieces of painting in existence, considering that gouache is a technique of painting. The watercolors are opaque, but glisten with light and shadow, making some of the details seem transparent. Indeed, so delicate is the handling that the leaves that flank the turf on the left and the strands of grass that grow on its right seem oddly translucent. It is as though one were looking into nature as well as at it.

[source]


Albrecht Dürer: Master Drawings, Watercolors, and Prints from the Albertina

The Great Piece of Turf (detail)

dukkha


This reading by Jacob Needleman of  The Dhammapada is set to start with his afterword
 


nothing does not change :: nothing is not dukkha :: nothing depends on nothing

Those three statements are just another take on the three marks of existence – the three signata of Buddhism – with the central statement leaving untranslated the untranslatable word dukkha.

anicca :: dukkha :: anatta

Think of dukkha as the potential for “all types of suffering, anguish, and angst” arising from the absence of what is wanted or the presence of what is not wanted. It follows also from not seeing (ignorance of) the other two marks of existence: anicca=impermanence and anatta=not-self.

Life is dukkha. And dukkha happens. Or not. It need not, of course.

Both formerly and now, it is only dukkha that I describe, and the cessation of dukkha.
—Siddhartha Gautama, the Buddha

“The great and beautiful secret of meditation practice is this: you can experience dukkha with equanimity.” —Zoketsu Norman Fischer

 
spoiler alert: to want anything is the cause of suffering; once needs are met, wants serve a self that exists only in the mind; to go beyond the mind is to let go of this imagined self and its needless wants
 

It takes practice, though, to want nothing.

It is you who must make the effort. The masters only point the way.
Dhammapada 20:276

want nothing other than that all be well and want nothing …

disclaimer: this is merely the view from here; your view may differ

the whole: credo redux

The whole is all being, all that is, all that is happening now – including the being thought of as you – and all of it nothing but change.


note: this post is an updated credo

Any being anyone is aware of – and this includes every human being – is the whole manifesting itself.

As for dukkha, it ranges from low-grade unease to full-on torment and depends on what else is going on in the mind. Beyond the mind there is no dukkha.

Reality, the whole of what is, includes the mind, of course. The whole comprises the known – a mental construct – and the unknown.

And the unknown includes the unknowable: what is beyond the mind.

Beyond the mind nothing does not change.

Only in the mind is there permanence.

Beyond the mind you are not who you are thought to be. No one is.

Only in the mind is anyone who they are thought to be.

Beyond the mind nothing is what it is thought to be.

Only in the mind is anything what it is thought to be.

Nothing is other than the whole. The whole is all being, all that is, all that is happening now – including the being thought of as you – and all of it nothing but change.

Nothing is unchanging. Nothing is an entity. Nothing is independent. Nothing is itself. Nothing is as it seems. Nothing is as it is said to be. Nothing is done by any being.

Other than the whole.

Except in the mind.

* * *

Only in the mind are there entities with attributes. They are abstractions, characters in a story of the world as it is imagined to be.

The thing is, reality is not a story. It’s the whole of what is happening now, causing – and caused by – the whole of what is happening now: eternal renewal.

enso_zen1

 
Ouroboros [aw-ROB-awr-uhs] … the image of a serpent or dragon eating its own tail, echoed here in an ensō, signifies eternal renewal. Beyond the mind nothing begins, nothing ends.
 

Any being anyone is aware of – and this includes every human being – is the whole manifesting itself. Any being – any aspect of reality – that any being is aware of is nothing other than the whole made manifest … by the whole.

* * *

There is nothing other than the whole – no being other than the whole – that is the cause of anything. It is pointless to judge anything or any living being for what it seems to be or do. It is pointless to judge people for what they may think or say. Whatever is happening is an effect of and has an effect on the whole. Nothing is done by any being other than the whole. Except in the mind.

Judging anyone or anything is pointless. May it be seen to be so.

 

  • nothing does not change
  • nothing is other than the whole
  • no being is other than the whole
  • any being is an effect of and affects the whole
  • nothing is done other than by the whole

 

Judging nothing lets you love everything. And judging no one lets you love everyone.

Being well – simply being aware of being – is nothing more than noticing and letting go of what is being sensed in body and mind. This is noticing and letting go without making sense, so to speak, of what is being sensed; without, in other words, telling ourselves a story about it.

Be well. Want nothing.


disclaimer: a credo is a point of view; the above is the view from here now

want nothing

vulture-and-child None need live in want, none need die of want when all of us want nothing.


We seem possessed with wanting more when in reality we want nothing. The issue is not what are we to do but how are we to be. Wanting more means doing more, and doing more means consuming – using up, destroying – more of what lets us all live. So we have to focus less on doing, more on being. But how?

 
Practice nisarga yoga and do only what lets you be and let be; live and let live; love and let love.

See that only in the mind can there be an entity or a separate being; that beyond the mind nothing is an entity and no one is a separate being.

Open up to all that is – beyond the mind – and want nothing.
 


see also Advertising: Are We Happy Yet? – advertising exploits our avidya/ignorance, namely our not seeing that we are not who we are thought to be°

what we know

799px-Michelangelo_Sündenfall
our big mistake: mistaking what we know for reality

 
Anything we know, believe, or imagine is a mental construct. It’s in the mind.

Nothing is what it is thought to be. Nothing that is not an abstraction, a mental construct, that is.

Reality is not what we know. It’s beyond the mind.

Reality is beyond the mind. And so of course are you. You are not the individual – the entity with an identity – you are known as.
Continue reading

nothing is eternal

enso_zen1
Ouroboros [aw-ROB-awr-uhs] … the image of a serpent or dragon eating its own tail, echoed here in an ensō, signifies eternal renewal°

the signata of Buddhism – anicca, dukkha,* and anatta° – recast:

nothing is eternal; nothing is okay; nothing is itself


 

*dukkha arises from ignorance (avidya=not-seeing) of the other two signata (anicca=impermanence, anatta=not-self)

As it is with nothing, so it is with the whole – with all that is … in this moment. It’s eternal. It’s okay. It’s itself.

It’s beyond the mind.