Brexit vote: before and after


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Noam Chomsky (interview)

from Truthout:


It is quite remarkable to see how little concern top planners show for the prospects of their own destruction — not a novelty in world affairs (those who initiated wars often ended up devastated) but now on a hugely different scale. We see that from the earliest days of the atomic age. The US at first was virtually invulnerable, though there was one serious threat on the horizon: ICBMs [intercontinental ballistic missiles] with hydrogen bomb warheads. Archival research has now confirmed what was surmised earlier: there was no plan, not even a thought, of reaching a treaty agreement that would have banned these weapons, though there is good reason to believe that it might have been feasible. The same attitudes prevail right to the present, where the vast buildup of forces right at the traditional invasion route into Russia is posing a serious threat of nuclear war.


… the vast buildup of forces right at the traditional invasion route into Russia is posing a serious threat of nuclear war
—Noam Chomsky


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Blowing the whistle on 9/11/73

… an Algonquin friend told me I didn’t understand something because my first language was English. She pointed out that the majority of words in English are nouns, while the majority of words in Anishinabe languages are verbs.
—Bob Thomson, in his NatPost article excerpted below

# Bob Thomson, CIDA, Chile, 1973, 9/11/73°

Bob Thomson, on being presented with the 2013 Integrity Award by Canadian Journalists for Free Expression (CJFE), said:

 
 
Freedom of expression goes hand in hand with the voices of that expression. Free expressions come with implications that we can easily miss if we rely only on our own cultural narratives. Several years ago, for instance, an Algonquin friend told me I didn’t understand something because my first language was English. She pointed out that the majority of words in English are nouns, while the majority of words in Anishinabe languages are verbs. They see the world from a perspective of action and process, while we see the world from a perspective of things. It was a profound revelation.
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Occupy Wall Street: The Revolution Is Love

Also cross-posted on the Adbusters website as

A Shift in Consciousness: It’s not that hard …

The status quo has us at each other’s throats. Mainstream economics sees this as the social ideal. More for you is less for me. Antagonism keeps the cash flowing. Maximize each moment lest someone else gain the market advantage on you. This sounds miserable, and it is, and yet it remains the system that most of us live every day. It’s time for a new model. Occupy economics reaches to a much more historical and spiritual precept. An idea rooted in the concept of love and cooperation: that more for you is more for me. Author of Sacred Economics Charles Eisenstein explains Occupy’s new logic of the heart.

Stream Sacred Economics (a short film based on the book) in its entirety on March 1.

Chris Hedges and Michael Moore: Unfettered Capitalism

# Capitalism – A Love Story (2009), Michael Moore, Chris Hedges